Primitive Technology

by Connor O


Stone adze(top) and hatchet(bottom)

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 Most primitive tools were made out of either wood, stone, flint, bone, or obsidian. Stone tools helped early humans to gain the power of farming, mining and so much more. With mining came the Bronze Age and with it, new technology.


A primitive stone shovel

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By mixing tin and copper together, people created an alloy called bronze. It was stronger and more flexible than copper or gold and didn’t rust. With the creation of bronze though, man could now effectively wage war against each other.

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When everybody had bronze weapons people realized that they needed something to protect themselves with, so they made armor, shields and polearms.

Mesopotamian warrior

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wooden bronze shield

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Animals of Africa

People on the autism spectrum often exhibit an intense focus on a particular area of interest. These affections may change over time, yet the level of enthusiasm remains the same. At SEEDs for Autism, we recognize that these passionate hobbies offer a level of comfort and stability to these unique individuals. From there, we can introduce new ideas and challenges to help our participants GROW. Daniel loves the animals of Africa, and during the creation of this blog post, he confidently stepped outside of his comfort zone. Apart from performing the technical skills of online research, typing, uploading images, adding categories and finding appropriate tags, Daniel opened his mind and imagined what he would say to these beloved animals.

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Good morning Lion, you have beautiful yellow fur!

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Good morning Meerkat, did you eat any good insects for breakfast today?

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Good morning Warthog, I like your mud bath. Does it help you stay cool?

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Good morning Hyena, I think you are a good hunter!

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Good morning Hornbill! You are a Royal Adviser.

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Good morning Mandrill, you are magical!

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Good morning Giraffe, you are the tallest animal in our village!

By Daniel Ch

Friendships Grow at SEEDs for Autism


Kyle, Jeff and Mallory share a smile during lunch break.


Friendship is born at that moment when one person says to another: ‘What! You too? I thought I was the only one.’
― C.S. Lewis

SEEDs for Autism is a non-profit organization that provides education and vocational training for young adults on the autism spectrum. Participants learn a variety of job skills, social skills and life skills in a structured environment focused on the arts. At SEEDs, these talented individuals produce a wide variety of high quality home and garden products which are sold into the community.

It sounds pretty amazing,
and it is…

But it’s so much more than that.

Truly, SEEDs is a life-changing program.

I have watched shyness turn into confidence.
I have seen meltdowns fade as coping skills develop.
I have seen distraction evolve into focus..
but, perhaps best of all –
I have seen these wonderful people find friends.

MB / Newsletter Instructor, SEEDs for Autism

Jordan and Camille prepare for an epic game of Scrabble during Social Day.


Participants at SEEDs spend time together before morning meeting.


Jesse Dean and Daniel Ch.


Jessica and Jesse

Seeds Encourages Me to Be Creative


I am in physical control with the piece that I shape with my

Own two hands in the wood department with my own independence.


I feel free to express myself due to the energetic atmosphere

In Amy’s department.


I am also inspired to be myself and use my imagination because of

The inspiring people I work with.

Jeff’s Odd Destinations: Valley of the Moon

Valley of the Moon

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First order of business, I have an important announcement to make. After much thought I have decided that “Jeff’s Eccentric People, Places and Things,” has to awkward a title. While I am pleased with how my work is coming out I decided to go with a different name. While “Eccentric Person of the Month,”  and “Unusual Place of the Month,” my old titles from the Seeds’ Newsletter have been suggested  I decided on “Jeff’s Odd Destinations” and “Jeff’s Gallery”

Now for a very special trip today, I take you on a very mysterious journey to a land of wonder and imagination. To Tucson Arizona’s mystic and mysterious Valley of the Moon. For over eighty years this strange land has enchanted children of all ages. Its story begins with the coming of the Mountain Gnome, George Phar Legler. Born in Evansville, Indiana somewhere between 1884 and 1887, George was a former post office clerk who was forced into an early retirement due to an automobile accident. He was also a spiritualist and believer in fairies. He moved to Arizona around 1917 and bought the 2.25 acres that soon became his life’s work. Nearby lived a clergyman whose teenage daughter was dying of tuberculosis. George created a little mountain scene with a waterfall and a bathtub lake just outside her window. She could leave her room and explore the serene landscape with her imagination. When she died George comforted her mother by telling her she had moved to the spirit world where she would live forever now. He found his life calling and expanded on the small landscape and started building the Valley in 1923.


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With the help of friends, family and locals George Legler constructed his “secret” fairyland and wild animal sanctuary, opening up officially in 1926 and full of homemade rock decorations, buildings and sculptures of wonder opening to the public . George lived on the property giving tours, telling stories and performing magic tricks as the Mountain Gnome. During the Valley’s original run it did not allow boys in-between the ages of 12 to 21 as visitors in because George thought that they would upset the fairies for not believing or being imaginative for the “magic” to work. The Valley was open until 1963. George would live by himself in his now abandoned fairyland until 1971, when he got an unexpected surprise visit from a group of High Schoolers. While the park never officially closed, visitors were coming less and less. The Valley was falling into disrepair due to vandals and George’s health was failing due to his age.


The boys apparently thought they all shared the same dream of a friendly gnome. Apparently they decided it was no dream and went on a quest to find an almost forgotten part of their childhood, climbed over the fence and rediscovered the Valley. While George at first thought they were vandals, the Mountain Gnome gave them an over two hour tour and told them that they were welcome back any time. The boys later formed the Valley of the Moon Restoration Association (VOMRA) now called the George Phar Legler Society (GPLS). The Valley of the Moon was listed on the Arizona Historic Places Register in 1975 and George was awarded the Tucson Outstanding Citizen Award a year before he died in 1982 around age 95. It is also an official National register of Historic Places under Pima County in 2011 and a Historic Landmark for the city as of 2016. The Valley is now owned mainly by the GPLS and partly by the Boy and Girl Scouts of America.

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Now, I have never been to the Valley of the Moon (yet) so I can only judge from what I have read and studied but the park contains a large number of statues and buildings made from scraps of old toys, and junk George found and put together. This includes the Wizard’s Tower, a bridge, a cave, a homemade pond and an artificial flower garden. In 2008 a number of sculptures were added from closed down mini golf course named Magic Carpet Golf now a car dealership. A house that a friend of George Legler helped build in the Valley became a storage room for props and costumes stood on the site but burned down not too long ago. Today the park is kept by members of the GPLS and volunteers. I don’t know if it is still an animal sanctum however.

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The Valley of the Moon is open on the first Saturday of every month for free and paid for visits are on special occasions and holidays. As well, exploring the Fairyland of the Desert shows are performed by members of the GPLS, many with the audience participating. You can find more information about the Valley of the Moon, George Legler, and helping to keep the wonder and magic alive at the website The Valley is at 2544 E. Allen Rd. Tucson AZ and can be contacted at 520-323-1331 and