Painting/Block-Printing Workshop at SEEDS for Autism

At SEEDs for Autism, our ongoing series of workshops provide new opportunities to empower our participants and encourage them to GROW! These talented young adults gain confidence as they share their skills with others, engage with the community and assist our staff during these inspiring interactive events. Last month, SEEDs participants Camille and Jake co-facilitated our Painting and Block Printing Side by Side workshop which was open to the community.

CAMILLE 
My name is Camille and I helped teach a painting workshop at SEEDS. On that day, I passed out the canvases to each person and I also designed the project everybody was working on. I designed a bird in its nest and everybody drew and painted it. I made sure everybody had clean water, helped them pick their paint and offered suggestions to make their drawings and paintings look better. I felt quite happy, confident and I look forward to teaching another painting class at SEEDS.

JAKE M. 
On Saturday, January 26th I led a block printing workshop at Seeds for Autism. The theme was birdhouses. The students had the opportunity to learn from scratch. After the students made their birdhouse designs they printed them on greeting cards. I felt really good about the workshop because I got to pass on a skill to others.

SONJA
On Saturday the 26th of January Seeds hosted a whimsical Bird painting class open to the community. The Instructors for the class were Michele, who is also the Newsroom instructor, Richard and Camille. The process was first drawing out your idea on a piece of paper using a template as a guide in creating the bird. Next we began to sketch our drawings onto the canvas. Then we picked out the colors we wanted for our paintings. I did the bird first then the background and finally the little details to make it my own. It was a fun day and I can’t wait for the next painting class at Seeds.

CHRIS M.
I had a nice experience working at the Printmaking Workshop last Saturday. This was my very first time doing physical print designs that we put on cards. I was a little unsure about making prints at first, but I tired it out anyway. I learned how to carve out a design on an art plate called linoleum, then I learned how to paint the linoleum design with a roller and lastly I stamped the design onto some cards to finish and take home. I designed a greeting card with video game character Crash Bandicoot in it. I would like to try new things in future workshops.

 Painting workshop participants pose with their beautiful artwork!

Print-making participants and their wonderful handmade greeting cards!

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What Are You Thankful For?

“I am thankful for what I am and have. My thanksgiving is perpetual.”
– Henry David Thoreau

Thanksgiving is a time where we share a meal together and celebrate our families, friends and the people we care about. In honor of Thanksgiving, we asked SEEDs participants to reflect on their lives and share their thoughts on what they are thankful for. 

MATTHEW
I’m pretty much thankful for the life I even have to begin with, having the family I was born in, and the world that I live in. Sure with all its ups, there’s also downs, but that’s just a part of everything. It’s what everyone goes through. Everyone is different, so not everything will be the same for them. Maybe they won’t even be born in the same reality. Over time, people will realize that there’s always gonna be some hardships they have to go through, but sometimes the point is to actually go through them and maybe come out somewhere on top. It’s all part of learning and knowing what to do when the time comes. We all just need to be thankful about what we have while we have them.

ANNA
I am thankful for my counselor and psychiatrist because they have in their own ways helped me feel better and lessen my OCD thoughts. My counselor has talked with me about my OCD and how I can stop it from affecting me. My psychiatrist has prescribed medicine that has lowered my compulsive OCD thoughts.

I am thankful for the internet because with its access I can find things I never knew about that I will enjoy. The internet can answer questions I have without paying money for a book that will answer my question or going to the library and looking for a book they may not have that could answer a lot of questions I have.

JESSE
I am thankful for my friends & family because without them life would be really boring.

RYAN D.
I am thankful for my family and my girlfriend and my friends.

BRIAN T.
I am thankful for Hot Wheels and I really like them because they are my favorite cars.

BRIANNA
I’m thankful for my family because they’re sweet, helpful and very kind! I’m thankful for SEEDs because it is a really fun place to learn, and also the instructors are really friendly and supportive!

JAKE
I am thankful for Seeds because I have friends.

NCAA: The Profit Machine

By Jake M.

I’ve been a big fan of college sports since I was eight years old. I always supported Arizona State University (ASU) athletics. There are many reasons to watch college sports from atmosphere to hot dogs but my favorite part of college sports is the purity of sports. Student athletes play for the love of the game and the fans rather than money. Unfortunately, the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) doesn’t share the same view. The NCAA has turned from student athlete driven to profit driven.

In the 2015 fiscal year, the 231 Division one (D-1) programs amassed a total $9.15 billion. 24 D-1 schools make upwards of $100 million compared to most programs that make $50 million or less. The NCAA March Madness produces roughly $900 million making it the most profitable. Most of the money for March Madness comes from CBS and Time Warner.

College football is also a good avenue. The top six college bowl game payouts per team ranges between $4 million to $6 million. The universities receive this money so there is no guarantee that all profits will be put back into the athletics department.

Just because college sports is a multi-billion dollar industry doesn’t mean everyone wins. In fact the biggest losers are the athletes. The athletes play for free due to the “students before athletes” ideology while they are being coached by men who earn multi-million dollar salaries. The argument is further extended by the emphasis on the word “scholarship” in athletic scholarship.

Another reason why people are against paying athletes is for the concern of bribery of players and other incentives that could manipulate the recruiting process. While this is a legitimate concern, with the right regulations in place we can protect the integrity of the recruitment and provide fair compensation to the players.

The farther a team advances the more money they make. Championship teams make the most. Fair compensation for student athletes should be dependent on a team’s success. Teams in college basketball, for example, should give athletes a 10% share for advancing through the first and seconds rounds. A team that advances to the third round should compensate athletes 15%. Finally, teams advancing to the quarterfinals or beyond should give athletes a 20% compensation. In football, each of the four teams selected to compete in the playoffs should award athletes 10% of the profits and the runner-up should payout athletes 15% and the Champion should payout 20%. Players deserve their fair share. Those who’re resistant to this concept are making it sound more complicated than it really is.

Aloha Day at Seeds for Autism

SEEDs for Autism is happy to provide organized recreational activities to empower those on the autism spectrum to explore their creativity, share new experiences, connect with others and GROW! At ALOHA DAYS, friends and family came together as a community to celebrate summer, learn about Hawaiian culture and have FUN! We asked some of our participants to share their experiences from this joyful and educational event.

CHRIS M
I went to Aloha Days at SEEDS with my parents. I spent my morning time playing “Topple” with Jeffery. I enjoyed playing, even though I was new to the game. Then my Mom convinced me to take part in one of the hula dances. I did try out the dance moves to make her proud. Then we got ready for Aloha Day lunch, which included teriyaki chicken, steamed rice, and fruit donuts. Overall, I had a nice time.

SONJA
Saturday the 11th of August I went to an event at Seeds for Autism called Aloha Days where we got to learn about the Hawaiian culture and dance the hula. My favorite part was doing the hula dancing. I loved how each dance tells a story about life and love. I got to eat a delicious pineapple donut and rice topped with chicken. I enjoyed myself a lot being able to hang out with friends and learn new things I didn’t know. I can’t wait for the next event coming soon!

DANIEL CH
I had fun at Aloha Day. I played volleyball with a Beach ball. I learned how to dance the Hula. My mom came and she ate Hawaiian food. I wore a Hawaiian shirt and played games. I made a sand castle and saw my friends at Seeds.

BRIAN
What I did at Aloha Days is relax and eat food and listen to music and play games.

Mikaela Shiffrin: American Skiing Star on the Rise

Image result for mikaela shiffrin

By Jake M.

In February 2018, the winter olympics was held in  PyeongChang, South Korea. While there are a wide range of events from hockey to curling my favorite is alpine skiing. Most Americans think of Lindsey Vonn and Ted Ligety as the image of the United States Ski team in their respective genders, however, a new star has begun to rise. Her name is Mikaela Shiffrin.

Born in Vail, Colorado she is the daughter of Eileen and Jeff Shiffrin (both former ski racers). Jeff raced for Dartmouth as an undergraduate; her mom Eileen raced in high school in the Berkshires, Massachusetts. Her Brother Taylor Shiffrin raced for the University of Denver.

Shiffrin wasted no time. As soon as she became eligible to race at an FIS (Fédération Internationale de Ski) event she took off. In just her eighth race, she won a Nor-Am Cup race in the super combined, in December 2010 at the age of fifteen. She finished in the top 3 in her next three races: Runner-up in the super-g, third in giant slalom, and victory in the slalom. Weeks later, she won a pair of Nor-Am races in Sunday River, Maine. She continued to shock the world when she won the Junior World Ski Championships in Crans-Montana, Switzerland.

She made her World Cup debut in on March 11, 2011 in a giant slalom race in Špindlerův Mlýn, Czech Republic. In April 2011, a few weeks after her 16th birthday, she won her first U.S. National Championship in Winter Park, Colorado and became the youngest Alpine Ski Racer to claim a national title. On December 29th, 2011 she finished third in the world cup slalom event at Lienz, Austria and in the 2013 World Cup season she took first place in Lenzerheide, Switzerland at the age of seventeen. Her overall world cup medal count is four with three gold and one silver (gold: 2013 Schladming, Austria, 2015 Beaver Creek, Colorado, 2017 St. Moritz, Switzerland, Silver: 2017 St. Moritz). The three golds came in slalom and the silver in giant slalom. Shiffrin has won 43 World Cup races which is fifth all-time by a Female Skier.

Her accomplishments don’t end there. She’s won three Olympic medals (2 gold and one silver). At age eighteen she won gold in slalom during the 2014 Sochi Olympic Games in Russia, and at age 22 she won Gold in giant slalom and silver in the super combined events in Pyeongchang, South Korea, 2018. Her two career gold medals are tied for most all time by an American Olympics skier (Ted Ligety and Andrea Mead Lawrence).

Shiffrin, now 23 years old, has a long career ahead and it seems inevitable that one day she will become the most decorated female skier. In a recent interview she was asked what the acronym ABFTTB on her helmet means. Her response “always be faster than the boys” made me laugh. Her story needs to be spread to inspire young skiers, especially girls.

 

Wednesday at SEEDs for Autism

Daniel and Sydney practice live blogging at SEEDs for Autism. They will be reporting on all the excitement happening at the Art Jam this Saturday!

12:47- Daniel N.

I observed in Distribution that Heather and Chris are packing shaving supplies in gift boxes.

12:43-Sydney

There are different kinds of pillows, like square, circular and triangular.

12:33 – Daniel N.

I observed Hunter working in the Weaving Department with Linda. Hunter was working on an orange scarf.

12:28- Sydney

I saw mini soap boxes, heart pendant necklaces and spoon rests.

12:16 – Daniel N.

Zach is sitting at a sewing machine for the first time with Bailey.

12:12- Sydney

They are making stuffed dinosaurs in Sewing, like a purple Pterodactyl that matches my shirt.

12:02-Daniel N.

Keri is in Metals attempting  to turn on the forge and Noah is helping her.

11:57- Sydney

There are lots of great products being made here at Seeds For Autism, like heart-shaped cutting boards and honey dippers.

11:47- Sydney

I saw some very pretty ceramic pieces.

11:43 – Daniel N.

I observed chain being made in the jewelry department by JD and  Daniel CH.

11:30- Michele

Newsletter class is starting and we are discussing LIVE BLOGGING. We are going to walk around SEEDs and write about what we see….