Jeff’s Eccentric People, Places and Things: J. P. Patches

image from lunchwithcasey.com

 

Will someone please explain to me whatever happened with the image of clowns? When did they go from beloved bringers of merriment to soul-eating demons, pedofile serial killers, and even a depressed living metaphor for the meaninglessness of life. From the Joker to Pennywise (who is floating back to Derry, Maine on the big screen this September) to real life evil clown John Wayne Gacy, and the “Evil Clown Sighting,” fad last year doesn’t help.  In fact, I think the only mainstream clown people do not fear is now just Ronald McDonald, well maybe except for health inspectors and PETA.

 

First of all I want to apologise to any readers who have coulrophobia, but I feel that this may help you get over your fear. Besides look at that glowing, grandfatherly figure with a red nose. Do you really feel terrified by good old Chris Wedes? Known by children of three generations in Washington State as Julius Pierpont (J. P. to his friends) Patches, Mayor of the Seattle City Dump.

 

A local gem of great value, J. P. was the star of one of the longest local American children’s television. The character first appeared in 1953 in the Minnesota station WTCN Channel 11 played by Daryl Laub. He created the clown and played him for two years, however he left for a rival studio and Chris Wedes took over the role. Chris, already a professional local actor, was unsure at first; as he already was playing several characters on various shows and didn’t want to be overworked. He soon took to the clown like a frog takes to water and even took him to Seattle in 1958. The clown would perform on his own Emmy-winning tv show for over twenty years on KIRO-TV with over 10,000 on screen hours viewed. The show would be improv without a script, with most of the characters being played by the same person. There was Ketchikan the Animal Man, Miss Smith the delivery woman biker, J. P.’s arch enemy Boris S. Wort (Second meanest man in the world!) the Swami of Pastrami and especially not forgetting the Mayor of the City Dump’s pain-in-the-kester love interest Gertrude. All played by the versible and equally talented Bob Newman. One special gimmick the the show had was an amazing magical machine called the I.C.U.2.T.V. This miraculous device, which was most certainly not cardboard with a tv camera in it, J. P. could look into the homes of young Patches Pals (name for fans) on their birthday and tell where to look for presents, that had nothing to do with parents sending in letters ahead to the studio. The I.C.U.2.T.V. also worked as a teleporter to send J.P. and others to North Pole to help Santa with his naughty and nice list for Christmas

image from jppatches.com

 

The J.P. Patches Show aired twice a day, six days a week, for the first thirteen years. The next eight years it only ran in the morning and just Saturday morning for the last two. While the cast was small there were quite a number of famous guest stars including cartoonist Al Capp, the Harlem Globetrotters, Colonel Sanders and many more. The show entertained both children and adults and had over 10 thousand hours of on-air time. It had at least 100,000 viewers especially in the Puget Sound area and southwest British Columbia. The Mayor of the City Dump also visited the Seattle Children’s Hospital in the Laurelhurst neighborhood for the sick kids free of charge. The show was canceled in 1981 but this was far from the end of J. P. Patches

Image result for spud goodman j p patches

image from spudgoodman.com

 

You can’t keep a good clown down apparently. Chris Wedes and Bill Newman would continue to perform their roles in television specials as well as numerous public and private events across the state. Sadly even this circus has to close its doors eventually. On September 17 2011 J. P. put on the makeup and tattered, old, button covered, hat and coat for the last time at Seattle’s Fishermen’s Terminal. Fans all hoped for him a long and happy retirement but that did not come to be. Chris Wedes died ten months later on July 22, 2012 from a long battle with Multiple Myeloma, a type of cancer for white blood cells. He was 84 and survived by his wife, daughter and granddaughter. All of Puget Sound was moister than usual from the tears of Patches Pales of all ages.

 

Like many other long running local children’s show host in other states, J. P. Patches remains a minor cultural icon and almost a folk hero to the people of the Rain City. There are clips and episodes are on VHS, DVD, and the Internet. Archie McPhee, Seattle novelty company that created the “Horse Head Mask” for the internet menu, has among other weird goodies, J. P. Patches lunchboxes, socks, Christmas Tree and scented car ornaments. Along with Oregon’s clown Rusty Nails, J. P. is said to have inspired the Simpsons’ Krusty the Clown and had a shout out in the episode “Radio Bart” on Krusty’s “Birthday Buddies” list. The biggest monument, aside from the memories in fan’s hearts, is the statue, Late for the Interurban, in Fremont, Seattle, dedicated on the show’s fiftieth anniversary

 

image from wikipedia.org

 

You know what, I won’t do this for every article from now on, but here’s another YouTube video. I’m just in the mood.

Ceramics

Hello, my name is Jose and I am going to write an article about my experience in the ceramics department. I work in the ceramics department with Ms. Ann Richards. She is very professional, but loving and caring person. I enjoy working with her. In Ceramics, I have learned how to make a bunch of items and make them fast. Before I learned how to make objects correctly, I was not very good. The first time I tried it, I would just slap the paint on. Ann did not like that! In order to grow, Ann told me to watch how Alex did it. Then I got better watching a pro at work. Alex really paid attention to his work. He would really go in and get every single divot, working inside and out from the center all the way to the outside. Because I am now a skilled ceramics student, I know how much paint to put on. It varies how many coats of paint I use and I also know about how gentle to stroke with the brush. Ms. Ann showed me about Painting with very light strokes to get the right quality of work.These are the many hard skills I have learned in ceramics. We make round flowers and birds and butterflies. Recently as in, last Thursday, I moved up to 3d objects. Mushrooms, for example. My experience in ceramics has taught me how to be a more gentle and attentive artist. I took 3d design in high school but did poorly every semester. Doing work in this dept. Has brought back to me a new sense of strength and purpose because I stunk at ceramics in high school but now I own it. Ceramics makes me feel good. When I see the finished product, I feel proud of myself. I like how it makes me feel when someone buys my product. Knowing, that someone is going to enjoy it later on gives me satisfaction because I know all my hard work went into someone’s happiness.

Golfing

One good reason I like golf is because it’s a sport that I can focus with my mind to make the ball go into the hole. I also had played golf in high school and was a part of the team and was the leader. I made great action from start to finish and I felt better than Tiger Woods.

But now I take golf as a good sport to focus on as a hobby. I still like to try out mini golf places because I can practice putting to learn skills for when I play real golf.

I still like golf even though it has been a long time for that. I had not practiced but still come out good for hitting the ball for long distance

I don’t have a problem struggling with golf, but I still want to make it as the icon.    

by Roberto

SEEDs for Autism Student Profile – Daniel

Daniel shares his experience in the wood department with an introduction to the process and his instructor, as well as the products he creates and the impact it has on his self esteem and job preparedness.

SEEDS provides education and vocational training for all functional levels of autism as well as providing resources for those on the autistic spectrum. We are proud to be one of the leading Phoenix resources for autism and our programs let those with autism spectrum disorders explore the possibilities and discover new skills in a structured environment.

Horse Hands Thunderbird Equine Charities

Have you ever thought of introducing your child to Equine Therapy? Well Thunderbird Charities at The Phoenix Zoo is just for you. Horse Hands has different levels of riding for all ages. Mini and Junior Horse Hands which includes a caregiver for your children ages 3-4 and 5-6. Prices for members are $120 and non-members are $150.

The first levels of riding are Levels 1-4 which are for ages 7-14. Horse Hands Level 1,This program is designed to develop safe and caring relationships between participants and horses. Participants learn basic caregiving skills such as grooming a horse and cleaning a horse’s stall. They also learn the process of preparing a horse to be ridden, which culminates with their first riding experience.

Horse Hands Level 2, This program is for those who have completed Level 1. Caregiving is continued in this level with participants learning about caring for a horse’s hooves and how to bathe a horse. Participants begin to develop riding skills that focus on basic control of a horse.

Level 3 is available for participants who have completed both Level 1 and Level 2. In this program participants will broaden their horsemanship knowledge by learning different breeds and colors of horses. As riding skills develop further, participants are taken outside the riding arena to test their skills on a trail ride.

To enroll in this program, participants must have completed Levels 1, 2 and 3. In this program participants learn the difference between healthy and unhealthy horses, common horse health issues and how to maintain a healthy horse through proper care. Each participant is assigned their own horse that they will care for throughout the series. Participants continue to develop their riding skills while being introduced to faster gaits.

 Ages 15+ is for adult riding classes.   If you have never been on a horse before, or if you are somewhat experienced with horses but would like to learn more about their behavior and caregiving, or just generally brush up on your horsemanship skills, then this program is for you. Horse Hands beginner classes helps the rider be independent and in control with maintaining a reasonably secure seat at the walk and trot through simple patterns with a saddle.

Horse Hands Novice 1 class for those who have earned the merit badges and passed the riding test for Horse Hands Riding Beginner level.  The Novice 1 rider fine tunes his or her seat positioning and control of the horse under saddle at the walk and trot. Students will perform moderately difficult patterns and will be introduced to the canter.

Horse Hands Novice 2 Horseback Riding
For those who have earned the merit badges and who have passed the riding test for Horse Hands Riding Novice 1 level.  Upon completion, the Novice 2 rider will have a solid seat and will be able to control his or her horse through complex patterns at the walk and trot.  Students will maintain a controlled canter and be able to perform basic movements at that gait. Horse Hands at the Phoenix Zoo is a unique program, including equine caregiving and horseback riding lessons, led by Certified Horsemanship Association (CHA)-accredited instructors.

Each Horse Hands program is a four-week series, where CHA equine handlers take students, based on their experience level, through the steps of meeting a variety of horse breeds, recognizing and taking care of their needs, bonding with them and learning to ride them safely.

Horse Hands is an educational, interactive and fun-filled experience connecting people of all ages to the wonder of horses and horseback riding. Classes take place at Thunderbirds Charities Equine Facility at the Phoenix Zoo and are available for children and adults! The primary focus of the Horse Hands Horseback Riding Series will be on riding, however, students will be required to know the caregiving aspects of horsemanship*.  

This program is a progression series in which students will have to test into higher levels.  A mandatory orientation will be required for all students entering into the Beginner class.  Students will enroll in 4 sessions, each session being 1 hour in length.

* participants must complete Level 1-4 before enrolling in the Riding Series

To register for Horse Hands, please contact Reservations at 602.914.4333.

To learn more about our CHA certification, visit http://www.cha-ahse.org.

 

By Melanie

Women in history

 

Image result for clara bartonImage result for queen elizabeth 1Image result for helen kellerImage result for joan of arc

 

 

There are hundreds of women throughout history, but I want to talk about the famous women like Clara Barton, Helen Keller, Queen Elizabeth the 1st  and Joan Of Arc because I find their lives to be fascinating. These women did a lot, like starting the American Red Cross,overcoming multiple health problems, founding a church and ending a war. They did amazing things and went down in history.

Clara Barton founded the American Red Cross to aid people in case of disasters like forest fires and hurricanes. She worked in a number of professions including teaching children. She helped find more than 22,000 missing soldiers.  Helen Keller was struck blind ,deaf and mute at 18 months old and until she was 6 years old threw temper tantrums because she couldn’t communicate. That changed when Anne Sullivan arrived and helped open her eyes to the world around her. Helen then did all kinds of things like going to college and meeting President Roosevelt and his wife. Queen Elizabeth never married, earning her the nickname “ the Virgin Queen”. She founded the Protestant church. She was the target of several assassination attempts, none of which were successful. Her reign was called the Elizabethan Era, during which there was a huge surge in culture. Joan of Arc helped the Crown Prince of France defeat the English and she was accused of being a heretic and burned at the stake. She was skilled at battling the English and winning the war.  She claimed to have divine visions of God.

Women have played a very important role in shaping history and changing the world for the better. We can all learn a lot from history and the people in it.

by Sydney