Ni no Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch(Review)

Hello, my name is Charles and I’m here to review Ni no Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch for the PlayStation 3.

 

Both this game’s story and setting takes place in the magical world of Ni no Kuni as well as the town of Motorville, which is geographically based near the city of Detroit, Michigan.

 

The protagonists in this game consist of Oliver (Wizard in training/Wand), Mr. Drippy (Lord High Lord of the Fairies), Esther (Songstress/Harp), Swaine (Ex-Prince aka Thief/LockGun) and Marcassin (Swaine’s little brother/Emperor/Wand).

 

The antagonists in this game consist of Shadar (Dark Djinn aka Demon Mage/Staff), Cassiopeia (Evil Empress aka White Witch) and Apus (White Witch’s Faithful Companion).

 

This game follows Oliver as he tries to save the world of Ni no Kuni from destruction at the hands of both Shadar and the White Witch while also trying to save his own mother.

 

In conclusion, this game’s storyline is not only the perfect blend of science & sorcery, but also shows the timely bond between parent & child forevermore.

Image result for ni no kuni wrath of the white witch

Related image

 

Advertisements

Jeff’s Odd Destinations: Valley of the Moon

Valley of the Moon

Image result for valley of the moon tucson

image from yelp.org

First order of business, I have an important announcement to make. After much thought I have decided that “Jeff’s Eccentric People, Places and Things,” has to awkward a title. While I am pleased with how my work is coming out I decided to go with a different name. While “Eccentric Person of the Month,”  and “Unusual Place of the Month,” my old titles from the Seeds’ Newsletter have been suggested  I decided on “Jeff’s Odd Destinations” and “Jeff’s Gallery”

Now for a very special trip today, I take you on a very mysterious journey to a land of wonder and imagination. To Tucson Arizona’s mystic and mysterious Valley of the Moon. For over eighty years this strange land has enchanted children of all ages. Its story begins with the coming of the Mountain Gnome, George Phar Legler. Born in Evansville, Indiana somewhere between 1884 and 1887, George was a former post office clerk who was forced into an early retirement due to an automobile accident. He was also a spiritualist and believer in fairies. He moved to Arizona around 1917 and bought the 2.25 acres that soon became his life’s work. Nearby lived a clergyman whose teenage daughter was dying of tuberculosis. George created a little mountain scene with a waterfall and a bathtub lake just outside her window. She could leave her room and explore the serene landscape with her imagination. When she died George comforted her mother by telling her she had moved to the spirit world where she would live forever now. He found his life calling and expanded on the small landscape and started building the Valley in 1923.

 

Image result for george phar legler

image from tucsonvalleyofthemoon.com

 

With the help of friends, family and locals George Legler constructed his “secret” fairyland and wild animal sanctuary, opening up officially in 1926 and full of homemade rock decorations, buildings and sculptures of wonder opening to the public . George lived on the property giving tours, telling stories and performing magic tricks as the Mountain Gnome. During the Valley’s original run it did not allow boys in-between the ages of 12 to 21 as visitors in because George thought that they would upset the fairies for not believing or being imaginative for the “magic” to work. The Valley was open until 1963. George would live by himself in his now abandoned fairyland until 1971, when he got an unexpected surprise visit from a group of High Schoolers. While the park never officially closed, visitors were coming less and less. The Valley was falling into disrepair due to vandals and George’s health was failing due to his age.

 

The boys apparently thought they all shared the same dream of a friendly gnome. Apparently they decided it was no dream and went on a quest to find an almost forgotten part of their childhood, climbed over the fence and rediscovered the Valley. While George at first thought they were vandals, the Mountain Gnome gave them an over two hour tour and told them that they were welcome back any time. The boys later formed the Valley of the Moon Restoration Association (VOMRA) now called the George Phar Legler Society (GPLS). The Valley of the Moon was listed on the Arizona Historic Places Register in 1975 and George was awarded the Tucson Outstanding Citizen Award a year before he died in 1982 around age 95. It is also an official National register of Historic Places under Pima County in 2011 and a Historic Landmark for the city as of 2016. The Valley is now owned mainly by the GPLS and partly by the Boy and Girl Scouts of America.

image from http://tucsonsbirthday.blogspot.com

Now, I have never been to the Valley of the Moon (yet) so I can only judge from what I have read and studied but the park contains a large number of statues and buildings made from scraps of old toys, and junk George found and put together. This includes the Wizard’s Tower, a bridge, a cave, a homemade pond and an artificial flower garden. In 2008 a number of sculptures were added from closed down mini golf course named Magic Carpet Golf now a car dealership. A house that a friend of George Legler helped build in the Valley became a storage room for props and costumes stood on the site but burned down not too long ago. Today the park is kept by members of the GPLS and volunteers. I don’t know if it is still an animal sanctum however.

Image result for valley of the moon tucson

image from flicker.com

 

The Valley of the Moon is open on the first Saturday of every month for free and paid for visits are on special occasions and holidays. As well, exploring the Fairyland of the Desert shows are performed by members of the GPLS, many with the audience participating. You can find more information about the Valley of the Moon, George Legler, and helping to keep the wonder and magic alive at the website www.tucsonvalleyofthemoon.com. The Valley is at 2544 E. Allen Rd. Tucson AZ and can be contacted at 520-323-1331 and valleymoon1@yahoo.com.

Inuyasha: The Secret Of The Cursed Mask (Review)

Charles did not see himself as a writer, until he was introduced to the SEEDs for Autism blog. Realizing that he could focus on the things that interest him, and share his thoughts with a larger audience – he discovered tremendous motivation and dedication in creating these reviews on the various video games he enjoys. (Ed.)

Hello, my name is Charles and I’m here to review Inuyasha: The Secret of the Cursed Mask for the Playstation 2. This game features an all-new storyline designed specifically for this game which takes place during Japan’s Feudal Era.

 

This game’s protagonists consist of Michiru (human male) or Kaname (human female)(Universal Magic/Shikigami), Inuyasha (half-demon male/hanyō)(Giant Sword/Tessaiga), Kagome (human female)(Bow & Arrows), Shippo (male fox demon)(Fox Magic), Miroku (human male/monk)(Magic Talismans as well as his Wind Tunnel), Sango (human female/demon slayer)(Giant Boomerang/Hiraikotsu) and Sesshomaru (Inuyasha’s older brother and a full-fledged demon/yōkai)(Cursed Sword/Tokijin).

 

This game’s antagonists consist of Naraku (demon warlord/male)(Poison), Kagura (female demon/wind sorceress)(Wind-Controlling Fan) and Utsugi(Michiru/Kaname’s ancestor)(Universal Magic/Shikigami).

 

In conclusion, this game is a definite blast to the past and I hope that you enjoy or enjoyed this game as much as I did.

Related image

Related image

Jeff’s Eccentric People, Places and Things: Mike Jittlov

 

Image result for mike jittlovimage from en.wikipedia.com

 

Who dosen’t like to go to the movies? I know prices for the snacks are outrageous when you can get them for at least three times less at the gas station. The lines are also a pain and so is all the crap you get for the first fifteen minutes of the show, (But I do enjoy  the film trailers). Well I guess we all could wait for Redbox to release the film for a buck or get Netflix. However some movies are almost forgotten as soon as they are made. Of course we’ve got our cult classics, b-movies, midnight movies and art films, but we have also have films so bad they probably should stay forgotten but we can’t because they are so bad ( I’m talking to YOU, M. Night Shyamalan’s “Last Airbender”). We do have some gems so rare they are hardly known and only the super nerdiest of nerds, geeks and film buffs can find, providing that they know what they are looking for. Which leads us to the almost unknown genuineness of Mike Jittlov.

 

Mike was born in Los Angeles on June 8, 1948. He became a math-language major at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and took an animation class to satisfy the art requirement. He made a number of short films specializing in stop motion, rotoscoping and pixilation, works that still look impressive for its time. His work won a number of awards and Academy Award nominations and even caught the eyes of the Walt Disney Company. There he created the shorts “The Collector” and its sequel “Mouse Mania” for Mickey’s 50th, a two hour special in 1978, celebrating the world famous mouse’s’ golden anniversary. “Mouse Mania” featured the first stop motion of Mickey Mouse and over one thousand Disney toys dancing in a psychiatrist’s office, with Mike Jittlov as the patient, to the tune “Baroque Hoedown,” the theme to the Disney’s Electrical Parade. The following year Jittlov worked on another project, a three minute short for another Disney special Major Effect entitled “The Wizard of Speed and Time.” In the short it…well…you know what, maybe it’s better if I just show you…

 

Whoa.

 

Just blows you away the first time you see it. Right? I mean, I can not describe how I felt when I first saw this. I learned about it in a documentary and looked forever to find it. Then, after many years, almost giving up on looking for the Wizard until, “BAM!” I discovered Youtube and experienced the magic for myself. But if you think that was amazing you should see what Mike had up his green robed sleeve. This…

 

Image result for wizard of speed and timeimage from moviepostershop.com

 

Yep,  in 1989 Mike Jittlov created a full fledged 95 minute movie based on the three minute short he created ten years ago. In this film Mike Jittlov played himself, a brilliant, eccentric but unknown jack of all movie trades trying to get his big break in showbiz, despite his talent he is non union and is constantly under attack from by the book, arrogant, money-grubbing bureaucrats out to steal or destroy his work. Mike also directed, wrote, and produced special and visual effects for the movie, among other things. A number of big named (well sort of) stars appeared in the film like Steve Brodie, Philip Michael Thomas of “Miami Vice” and “Grand Theft Auto: Vice City” fame, voice actor Will Ryan and Stephen Stucker. Music was done by John Massari, who also created  the soundtrack for “Killer Klowns from Outer Space,” and Russell Carpenter worked on cinematography. He later worked on big name films including “Titanic,” “Charlie’s Angels” and “Shallow Hal.” There was even a cameo of Ward Kimball, award winning animator and on of  Walt Disney’s core animators the “Nine Old Men.”  I just love this film, five out of five star entertainment at its best.

Sadly “The Wizard” was not released in theaters for very long and only appeared in a selected areas. It has been released on VHS and LaserDisc, but not on an official DVD, and has mostly great reviews at about every website I found about it. There is a created DVD image file made by fans that Mike is aware of and supports that is available on peer to peer networks until an official is released and the complete movie and others of his works are available on Youtube for your entertaining pleasure.

 

The question that Jittlov fans all over the world (all ten dozen of them) ask is what happens next? Where is our Wizard in the robe of Green? To tell you the truth he pretty much remained a mystery. He was a fairly common visitor at conventions during the nineties. He worked as a special effects technician on the blockbuster film “Ghost” and played was the voice of Han Solo in the fan film “Darth Vader’s Psychic Hotline,” and was was an early internet user creating his own website:http://www.wizworld.com/ but it REALLY needs an update. From what I’ve heard Mike gave up making movies due to the bad luck he had with the limited release “The Wizard,” and not getting much money from the video release. Lately has moved back in with his mother to look after her in her old age. Hardly anyone know of him. Where are the Wizard of Speed and Time fanarts or cosplayers at Comic Con? Still even if he never creates another film again and despite being barely known, I still see him as a renaissance man and genius who helped bring stop motion to new levels and hop with this article more people will start appreciating that wonderful green Wizard of Hollywood, and as Mike sometimes says, “May all your fine wishes and good dreams come true”.

 

Image result for wizard of speed and timeimage from pinterest